Anarchist Social Democracy

Critical Rationalism, Darwinism, Libertarian Socialism, Anarchism, Libertarian Municipalism, Mutualism, Fabian Socialism, Social Democracy, Georgism, Voluntaryism

Welcome to the Anarchist Social Democracy Page!

 Anarchist Social Democracy has a few main pillars:

(1) Georgism: public-ownership of land, where a “land value tax” is collected as a form of rent in order to fund government programs (one of which would be Universal Basic Income or a Citizens’ Dividend)

(2) Municipal Socialism: public-ownership of industrial and commercial enterprise, where the local municipality owns, and can therefore regulate, enterprises and take a share of the profits as a tax (but the enterprises shall be organized as workers’ co-operatives and the administration of the enterprises shall be up to the workers themselves, within certain limits/guidelines set by the municipal government)

(3) Anarchist Direct Democracy: the people would govern directly through face-to-face assembly democracy, using a consensus-oriented decision-making process

(4) Social Democracy: one of the key duties of the government would be to provide for the basic social welfare of its citizens (this would include free healthcare, free education, universal basic income, etc.)

(5) Redistribution: there would be a voluntaryist form of progressive taxation that would redistribute excessive accumulations of wealth downwards, creating an egalitarian and classless society

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About me: My name is W. J. Whitman. I am an organizer for Food Not Bombs and an amateur political theorist/writer.

When I got out of high school, I started getting into politics and economics. I first got into libertarianism through the writings of F.A. Hayek and Ludwig von Mises, and ultimately ended up reading Murray Rothbard (although I was never a Rothbardian myself). I also read Wendell Berry, G. K. Chesterton, and Hilaire Belloc, among others, and got really interested in permaculture, distributism, and the agrarian critique of capitalism. I ended up fusing these two different strains of thought into my own philosophy of “anarcho-distributism,” which was really roughly equivalent to the synthesis of individualist anarchism and mutualism espoused by Clarence Lee Swartz and Kevin Carson. I came to the same place, but through a different route. Ultimately, I gravitated further to the left. I read Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Eduard Bernstein, the Fabian socialists, Henry George, Murray Bookchin, Janet Biehl, David Graeber, and Abdullah Öcalan. I came to reject the individualist-mutualist synthesis of the C4SS crowd and began advocating my own philosophy of libertarian social democracy or anarchist social democracy.

My views are basically libertarian municipalist or democratic confederalist. However, I am also a social democrat. I believe in direct democracy, but I am also realistic about the fact that electoral politics and representative democracy can be used for good within the existing system. Furthermore, I do not embrace "full communism" because I believe that money is necessary for any egalitarian society of the future. It would be impossible to distribute wealth equitably without some means of accounting.

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